Multipurpose Page Example

The introduction section can have a solid background color or an image. The text is always in all caps, so it's best to keep this caption area brief!

Main Content and Sidebar

This is the first thing your site visitor is going to see, so it's important to use it wisely! It's a great place to introduce an academic area, a program, or give an overview. This area has a full wysiwyg toolbar, so you can add links, inline images, and even video. One thing to keep in mind when using this section is that if you use all of the available sidebar options on the right, the left content area really needs to have enough content to fill it up. If it's not filled, you end up with a white space at the bottom of the left side.
 

Sidebar

The sidebar can be static or turned into a simple slideshow with icons.  If you choose not to use the sidebar, the text section will go all the way across the page. This section is divided into a left main content area and right sidebar.
 

Anchor Links

In the black bar section above the main content area, you can add anchor links. An anchor link will take your site visitor straight to another section further down the page. This makes essential information quickly accessible without scrolling. 
 

Helpful Hints

There are 19 multipurpose sections. Their order is static and you can not change their position by dragging them up or down the page. However, because the page is so flexible, your content can usually be displayed nicely in multiple sections. 

Video Spotlight & Articles

This section can have multiple videos and two articles. You will also need a splash image for your video.

Dotted Line Section

This section is helpful for illustrating areas such as program subsections or department majors and minors. You can add up to five dots and can choose between a red, grey, or white background color.

Undergraduate Major One

As they click on the dots, the site visitor sees a brief overview of your program. If your description is not long enough, there are sometimes layout problems. They can click on the link below to get event more information about the program.

Learn more about Major One

Undergraduate Major Two

As they click on the dots, the site visitor sees a brief overview of your program. If your description is not long enough, there are sometimes layout problems. They can click on the link below to get event more information about the program.

Learn more about Major Two

Undergraduate Major Three

As they click on the dots, the site visitor sees a brief overview of your program. If your description is not long enough, there are sometimes layout problems. They can click on the link below to get event more information about the program.

Learn more about Major Three

Single & Multi Image Callouts

Single Image

The single image callout has one image and multiple slides with text and an optional link.

Learn about this program

Multi Image

A multi-image callout can have multiple photos and multiple slides with text along with the optional link.

Learn about this program

Call to Action Section

This section is used to ask visitors to do something. Examples are to learn more about a topic, sign up for a newsletter, make an appointment, apply, or donate. The text is usually brief and to the point. You can choose between a white, red, blue, yellow, or gray background.

Apply Now

First Content Block

This section is a basic wysiwyg space. Its options include having a white or grey background and a choice of one or two columns.  You can add video and photos, but it's also a great option for the wordier sections of your page. 

 

Spotlight Section

Displayed in this first content block are screenshot examples of the Spotlight Section which is located directly below it. There are four different kinds of spotlights:

Video

 

Static Image

 

Fullscreen Video

 

News & Events

 

People Teaser

Here is one of the layout options for the "People Teaser" section. Other options include 1-column or 3-column with either white or grey backgrounds.

Resources Callout

Each resource card has a title, subtitle, an icon, and link to a page or document with more information. All resource cards in this area will also be displayed on the Resource page.  You can also add links to the red Additional Resources area below the resource cards. This is a great area for outside links!

Second Content Block

This section is just like the First Content Block further up the page. This section is a basic wysiwyg space. Its options include having a white or grey background and a choice of one or two columns.  You can add video and photos, but it's also a great option for the wordier sections of your page. This particular content block is grey and has two columns.

This section is just like the First Content Block further up the page. This section is a basic wysiwyg space. Its options include having a white or grey background and a choice of one or two columns.  You can add video and photos, but it's also a great option for the wordier sections of your page. This particular content block is grey and has two columns.

This section is just like the First Content Block further up the page. This section is a basic wysiwyg space. Its options include having a white or grey background and a choice of one or two columns.  You can add video and photos, but it's also a great option for the wordier sections of your page. This particular content block is grey and has two columns.

This section is just like the First Content Block further up the page. This section is a basic wysiwyg space. Its options include having a white or grey background and a choice of one or two columns.  You can add video and photos, but it's also a great option for the wordier sections of your page. This particular content block is grey and has two columns.

 

Timeline Slideshow

this section displays dates and slides on a timeline

WUSTL Shield, decorative

Slide Title 1

Here's one using a background image. We recommend using dark background images in this section because the font is always white.

Slide Title 2

You have the option to display the date or not display it. This slide is not displaying its date.

Slide Title 3

Each slide can be associated with a date. Background images are optional. This slide doesn't have a background image.

Bookshelf Title

Tear Down the Walls: White Radicalism and Black Power in 1960s Rock
Astaire by Numbers: Time & the Straight White Male Dancer
The Art Ensemble of Chicago
Gaugin: Portraits
The Norton Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
Michelangelo, God’s Architect: The Story of His Final Years and Greatest Masterpiece
 Slow Birding: The Art and Science of Enjoying the Birds in Your Own Backyard
The Art of Scenic Design: A Practical Guide to the Creative Process

Tear Down the Walls: White Radicalism and Black Power in 1960s Rock

From the earliest days of rock and roll, white artists regularly achieved fame, wealth, and success that eluded the Black artists whose work had preceded and inspired them. This dynamic continued into the 1960s, even as the music and its fans grew to be more engaged with political issues regarding race. In Tear Down the Walls, Patrick Burke tells the story of white American and British rock musicians’ engagement with Black Power politics and African American music during the volatile years of 1968 and 1969. The book sheds new light on a significant but overlooked facet of 1960s rock—white musicians and audiences casting themselves as political revolutionaries by enacting a romanticized vision of African American identity. These artists’ attempts to cast themselves as revolutionary were often naïve, misguided, or arrogant, but they could also reflect genuine interest in African American music and culture and sincere investment in anti-racist politics. White musicians such as those in popular rock groups Jefferson Airplane, the Rolling Stones, and the MC5, fascinated with Black performance and rhetoric, simultaneously perpetuated a long history of racial appropriation and misrepresentation and made thoughtful, self-aware attempts to respectfully present African American music in forms that white leftists found politically relevant. In Tear Down the Walls Patrick Burke neither condemns white rock musicians as inauthentic nor elevates them as revolutionary. The result is a fresh look at 1960s rock that provides new insight into how popular music both reflects and informs our ideas about race and how white musicians and activists can engage meaningfully with Black political movements.

Astaire by Numbers: Time & the Straight White Male Dancer

Astaire by Numbers looks at every second of dancing Fred Astaire committed to film in the studio era--all six hours, thirty-four minutes, and fifty seconds. Using a quantitative digital humanities approach, as well as previously untapped production records, author Todd Decker takes the reader onto the set and into the rehearsal halls and editing rooms where Astaire created his seemingly perfect film dances. Watching closely in this way reveals how Astaire used the technically sophisticated resources of the Hollywood film making machine to craft a singular career in mass entertainment as a straight white man who danced.

Decker dissects Astaire's work at the level of the shot, the cut, and the dance step to reveal the aesthetic and practical choices that yielded Astaire's dancing figure on screen. He offers new insights into how Astaire secured his masculinity and his heterosexuality, along with a new understanding of Astaire's whiteness, which emerges in both the sheer extent of his work and the larger implications of his famous "full figure" framing of his dancing body.

Astaire by Numbers rethinks this towering straight white male figure from the ground up by digging deeply into questions of race, gender, and sexuality, ultimately offering a complete re-assessment of a twentieth-century icon of American popular culture.

The Art Ensemble of Chicago

The Art Ensemble of Chicago est regardé depuis sa création en 1966 comme l’un des groupes les plus influents du jazz et de la musique expérimentale. Dans ce livre, Paul Steinbeck suit en détail sa trajectoire jusqu’à la fin des années 2010. Il analyse ses performances et explique comment les membres de l’Art Ensemble sont capables d’improviser ensemble dans de nombreux styles différents tout en s’appuyant sur un vaste répertoire de compositions notées.

La nouveauté de la théorie de l’improvisation qui anime le groupe ressort également des dimensions intermédiales de leurs performances, qui intègrent la musique à la poésie, au théâtre, aux costumes et au mouvement. Au-delà de l’activité proprement musicale du groupe, l’auteur éclaire enfin un modèle distinctif de relations sociales, de pratiques de coopération et d’autonomie personnelle que ses membres ont adapté de l’Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), collectif dont The Art Ensemble of Chicago est issu.

Gaugin: Portraits

The first in-depth investigation of Gauguin’s portraits, revealing how the artist expanded the possibilities of the genre in new and exciting ways

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) broke with accepted conventions and challenged audiences to expand their understanding of visual expression. Nowhere is this phenomenon more evident than in his portraits, a genre he remained engaged with throughout all phases of his career. Bringing together more than 60 of Gauguin’s portraits in a wide variety of media that includes painting, works on paper, and sculpture, this handsomely illustrated volume is the first focused investigation of the multifaceted ways the artist approached the subject.

Essays by a group of international experts consider how the artist’s conception of portraiture evolved as he moved between Brittany and Polynesia. They also examine how Gauguin infused his work with symbolic meaning by taking on different roles like the Christ figure and the savage in his self-portraits and by placing his models in suggestive settings with alluring attributes. This welcome addition to the scholarship on one of the 19th century’s most innovative and controversial artists reveals fascinating insights into the crucial role that portraiture played in Gauguin’s overall artistic practice.

Cornelia Homburg is guest curator at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Christopher Riopelle is curator of post-1800 paintings at the National Gallery, London.

The Norton Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

Available as both a portable paperback volume and an enhanced digital edition, this complete collection of The Norton Chaucer: Canterbury Tales is meticulously glossed and annotated. With access to the ground-breaking Reading Chaucer Tutorial included in every new copy, this volume delivers unmatched support and value.

Michelangelo, God’s Architect: The Story of His Final Years and Greatest Masterpiece

As he entered his seventies, the great Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo despaired that his productive years were past. Anguished by the death of friends and discouraged by the loss of commissions to younger artists, this supreme painter and sculptor began carving his own tomb. It was at this unlikely moment that fate intervened to task Michelangelo with the most ambitious and daunting project of his long creative life.

Michelangelo, God’s Architect is the first book to tell the full story of Michelangelo’s final two decades, when the peerless artist refashioned himself into the master architect of St. Peter’s Basilica and other major buildings. When the Pope handed Michelangelo control of the St. Peter’s project in 1546, it was a study in architectural mismanagement, plagued by flawed design and faulty engineering. Assessing the situation with his uncompromising eye and razor-sharp intellect, Michelangelo overcame the furious resistance of Church officials to persuade the Pope that it was time to start over.

In this richly illustrated book, leading Michelangelo expert William Wallace sheds new light on this least familiar part of Michelangelo’s biography, revealing a creative genius who was also a skilled engineer and enterprising businessman. The challenge of building St. Peter’s deepened Michelangelo’s faith, Wallace shows. Fighting the intrigues of Church politics and his own declining health, Michelangelo became convinced that he was destined to build the largest and most magnificent church ever conceived. And he was determined to live long enough that no other architect could alter his design.

Slow Birding: The Art and Science of Enjoying the Birds in Your Own Backyard

Many birders travel far and wide to popular birding destinations to catch sight of rare or “exotic” birds. In Slow Birding, evolutionary biologist Joan E. Strassmann introduces readers to the joys of birding right where they are.

The Art of Scenic Design: A Practical Guide to the Creative Process

How do you navigate a career as an entertainment designer while maintaining a sense of self-worth and value in the various off-ramps and sidestreets you may choose to take on the journey? “The Art of Scenic Design: A Practical Guide to the Creative Process” provides an in-depth look at the scenic design process for young designers as well as creative entrepreneurs seeking to nurture a collaborative environment that leads to rediscovery and innovation in their work. 

Based on his 30 years of experience in stage design, exhibit design, art direction for film, and theme park and industrial design, Robert Mark Morgan demonstrates that while a design process for creating these types of works can seem like niche professions, the lessons learned in collaboration, testing and re-testing ideas, prototyping concepts, overcoming fears, venturing guesses, divergent thinking, and the creative process in general are applicable – and valuable – in nearly all disciplines and professions both inside and outside of the entertainment industry.

In “The Art of Scenic Design” you will follow an accomplished designer on a narrative of the theatrical design process from early phases of a design with a creative team encompassing visual research, idea-making, and collaborative relationships, to sketching, prototyping, and testing ideas, through to the execution and manifestation of the design with a team of artists and collaborators. The design journey is contextualized with backstage stories of “what if?” moments, provocative discussions, and lessons that are indispensable to your professional development.

Additional Resources Section (a great place for those links!)

A Testimonial is a content type. You can add as many testimonials to your site as you like, and then select which one to show on any multipurpose page or on the home page. It's a good idea to ask one or two students, both undergraduate and graduate, to provide testimonials each year. We also recommend asking for testimonials from your faculty and alumni. This is a creative way of telling your story and helping visitors to understand what makes your department special.

―Author's NameClass of 2023

Footer Callout

A final opportunity to ask a visitor to do something or to offer them more help finding what they need. This section has a button, an area to add social media icons, and a choice of a white or grey background.

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